Atelier La Juntana Summer School with MSA 9th-15th July 2019

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Following the success of the last two years of MSA collaborating with Atelier La Juntana we are pleased to announce the third edition of the MSA exclusive week taking place 9th – 15th July 2019. The course takes place in the north of Spain outside the city of Santander in the coastal town of Liencres.

Students of 1st, 2nd and 5th year Architecture are encouraged to take part in the week long course which provides a foundation in a wide range of making skills for your design and presentation work back here at MSA.

Watch footage for the last two MSA atelier groups here:

*********    DON’T MISS OUT – APPLY FOR 2019 NOW!    **********

MSA Students will pay the discounted rate of £425 for the full week long course and also have the option 8 nights of discounted accommodation. This fee may be further reduced  subject to extra sponsorship.

Fees Update: Funding from the student experience fund here at UoM has allowed a further discount to MSA applications which will be subsidised by at least £50. The exact amount will depend on the final number of attendees and will be applied after applications close. 

Apply here for more information about the 2019 MSA exclusive week:

atelierlajuntana@gmail.com

More information about the course can be found on the ALJ website here: http://www.atelierlajuntana.com/SummerWorkshop.html

Photo highlights from Atelier La Juntana with MSA 2018 are displayed below. Highlights from 2017 can be found by clicking here.

SimpsonHaugh B.15 Modelmaking Workshop 2019 – Shortlist

This year we have received a record 65 applications for the SimpsonHaugh B.15 Modelmaking Awards across the BA3 and MArch cohorts of MSA. The quality of these applications has been of a high standard making the collective task extremely difficult to whittle down the number to a shortlist of 8 for BA3 and 8 for MArch.

We want to congratulate everybody who submitted this year making this a difficult process for all involved. The quality of the work overall has been fantastic and helps make this years show a great success.

In no particular order the shortlsited candidates are:

BA 

Callum Richardson

Cameron Frame

Emily Edwards

Faizal Akalwaya

Hayley Sheldon

Harry Tate

Max King

Ana Mayte Alvarado

 MArch

Courtnay Ives & Yiting Zhou

Sean Martin

Maciej Augustynowicz

Nicholas Royce

Sandhya Parekh

Charlotte Hagerty

Lobna Elagouz

Andrew Chung

View the submissions that made the shortlist here:

BA Shortlist 2019

MArch Shortlist 2019

Final judging will take place tomorrow and the winners will be announced at 18.00 approx during the private view.

Best of luck to all and thank you all for getting involved and making this awards scheme such a great success,

Scott, Jim & Saul @B15workshop

“Made from Jesmonite” CPD presentation June 11th – Free to MSA Staff and Students

Whilst we have used Jesmonite in the B.15 workshop for small scale casting, it’s wider applications across the building industry are often overlooked. 

From the Jesmonite website: “Jesmonite is the ultimate chameleon material of the building industry – it can be used to replicate the appearance and texture of any surface finish in any number of colours.

The combination of natural raw materials with a special blend of water based pure acrylic polymers create a unique family of materials that have a number of product benefits that make Jesmonite superior to other building materials.”

 


Made Frome Jesmonite – CPD Presentation

11.00 Tuesday June 11th, Humanities Bridgeford Street Room G32

This presentation will discuss how the background of Jesmonite and its various applications in craft, design and building construction.

Free to MSA Staff and Students.

Please register to attend on Eventbrite by clicking here.

Find out more about Jesmonite here.

Submit your projects for the SimpsonHaugh B.15 Modelmaking Awards 2019

Submissions for the SimpsonHaugh B.15 Modelmaking awards are now open. This year all submissions are required as a PDF document as detailed below.

Remember that the awards are open to MSA’s BA 3rd year and both 5th and 6th year of MArch. There are 3 prizes for BA and 3 prizes for MArch.

As the awards are judged on overall use of modelmaking as well as stand alone projects we recommend taking time to refine your submission so take your time including as few or many project models as you wish. Featured projects will need to be visible at the exhibition on the afternoon of June 7th even if only place there for that time.

Shortlisted projects will be announced on June 6th before being judged by representatives of B.15, MSA and SimpsonHaugh on Friday June 7th where the winners will also be announced.


Submission Criteria:

  • Maximum 350 Words in the main body of text explaining:
    a) Your project brief, its location and purpose
    b) Your use of modelmaking, scale, material and processes that you have used and why.
  • Text should be in Effra Font (file included if you don’t have it on your computer) Size 10
  • Place 3 to 6 images of your modelmaking work (over the 2 pages) in its completed state these can include process images.
  • Each image should be titled appropriately as shown in the example page layout.
  • 2 x separate A4 pages only
  • Saved as a 2 Page PDF

The submission InDesign template (preset basic format for your submission), Effra Font and past example submission can be downloaded here as a ZIP Document.

Please send completed PDF files to scott.miller@manchester.ac.uk no later than 18.00 on Friday 31st May.

Best of Luck,

Jim, Scott and Saul

SimpsonHaugh Meet the Modelmaker Drop-in dates

As part of our second year collaborating with SimpsonHaugh Architects in-house modelmakers Kaia Williams and Phillipa Seagrave will be spending two days in the workshop ahead of this years submissions. Their experience of face paced modelmaking for design development and competition offers a great opportunity for all years to seek advice about their own work so please come along and have a chat.

For your chance to chat with them and discuss any ongoing or future ideas you may have drop into B.15 on either Friday 1st or 10th May.

Further details regarding this years awards submission will be announced soon.

 

MA Architecture + Urbanism ‘Undoing Urbanism’ Masterplan Model

A recent modelmaking project from MSA’s MA Architecture + Urbanism course has gained media coverage in recent weeks. The Northern Quarter masterplan has taken centre stage in the window of Fred Aldous craft store. So what’s the story behind this huge eye catching display? Student Dorcas Agbana kindly explained the project:

We initially had a measured drawing of Northern Quarter but the scale on paper didn’t help us understand the context to its full extent. For part of our project a public consultation was scheduled at the Craft Centre and a model seemed like the best way to translate design to “reality” for the studio group and to the public.

We’ve learnt that physical objects are easier to grasp by laymen over technical architectural jargon and so this 3D manifestation seemed like the best way to explain our design process and showcase how our many ideas interlinked.

Concept art showing the model featured in Fred Aldous window display

 

Working in the studio space, the model was used to get a better understanding of scale (context and individual buildings), to figure out scope of the groups design interventions. It allowed us to plug in ideas to see how they worked, how we could link different concepts into one narrative and to holistically figure out new transport routes and better identify pockets of relief.

Initially, around 20-30 members broke the whole model into smaller zones to execute it. It took around a 5 day week to get the initial model done. And then around 10 – 15 students worked for another week to prepare it for public display in Fred Aldous shop front.

 

Since the display was completed the feedback has been positive. We have observed people pause and stare, we’ve gotten comments on how to better design it for the public to understand. People who have seen and read the articles and the brochure on the studio have since made a trip to the store to check out the model. The model will stay in the window until at least the end of March, but its next home has not been decided yet.

 

It was an interesting experience for everyone as the scale of the model made it probably the largest one that any one of us had worked on. In the studio it  helped all the students to better work together. The process was grueling and physically exhausting towards the end, but the end product makes it worth it!

It’s great to see the model being so publicly used to get people talking about the architecture and urban spaces in an area which has been subject to a number of controversial changes over the last year. Individual student proposals were published in the MEN giving the project further coverage in the region.Read the article here

Be sure to follow Architecture and Urbanism on their Instagram/Twitter to find out more about their ongoing projects Instagram: @maaumsa Twitter: @undoingurbanism

Thanks to Dorcas for explaining the project in more detail.

Students who worked on the model installation at Fred Aldous were: Dorcas Agbana, Priya Renganathan, Rayhane Saber, Marina Kuliasova, Bowen Zhang, Qu Zhang, Shuqian Zhou, Haochu Chen, Tian Gechuan, Dongli Huang, Tingting Miao, Yangyang Bao, Zhaozhao Zhang, Ramita Dewi Lubis, Anggita Krisnandini and Feng Daio

‘Bearing Rome Across The Alps’ – A Brief History of Cork Modelling and its Contemporary Potential

Fig 1. Modern Cork Model of the Temple of Castor and Pollux ©Dieter Cöllen

There is very little published about the nearly lost art of cork modelling aside from a few fairly recent articles and research papers. Before being attributed to architectural forms in the 18th Century, carving with cork was a tradition associated with nativity scenes in southern Italy (Gillespie, 2017). The idea of modelling this way most likely came from a combination of convenience; cork being a common, lightweight and versatile material for quick fabrication, as much as any creative individuals desire to replicate and simply enjoy the tactile craft of making with it.

The refinement of this unusual but captivating form of modelling occurred during a great period of artistic and cultural exploration in Europe. During what could be described as the original ‘gap year’, eighteenth century grand touring took young people across the continent via the most notable and artistically rich cities. This was something of an exclusive privilege that required a significant wealth and strong will of curiosity for the unfamiliar. Everyday living requirements meant a need to be flexible in tastes both for practical and dietary comforts. On every level of perception the experience was sure to be eye opening for anyone willing to embark on such a journey.

Experiencing a new destination for the first time as a modern traveller, you would think it common place to see an abundance of stalls and shops stacked with keepsakes, often mass produced junk that are rife in tourist spots. At the time of the grand tours, this shameless ‘cashing-in’ trade was fledgling if non existent. Despite this, amongst the increasing number of visitors, there was a great desire to somehow record experiences of travelling which led to traditional and art’s and craft based methods or recording being adopted. Visitors fascinated by the large scale architecture and ruins of ancient Rome took time to draw, paint and carve what they saw in order to take some momentos home. This collective practice brought back a new vision, a blueprint of how the classical world could inform a modern British design.

As well as the grand tourists giving these crafts a go themselves there were some forward thinking artisan-entrepreneurs who began producing models to sell. According to Dieter Cöllen the originator of this method of making is commonly thought to have been Roman architect Agusto Rosa. Following his death came Antonio Chichi who produced probably the most famous cork models for sale to tourists in Italy (Cöllen, 2014). These miniature 3D sketches, copies of the classics in that moment, would then find their way back over the Alps towards Western Europe and beyond with many ending up in private collections to this day.

Cöllen, an artist and craftsman, has become the current go-to maker on the subject of cork modelling or ‘Phelloplastike’ – a work derived from the Greek word for cork. His works have gained attention around the world for their outstanding levels of accuracy and due to the specialist nature of the medium it is widely thought that his skills and experience are unparalleled in the field. Whilst these works are undoubtedly stunning pieces many have had the advantage of modern crafts tools which puts the skill behind the original 18th Century examples into perspective.

Fig 5. Richard Du Bourg Colosseum Model 1775 © Museums Victoria

Given the age of limited numbers of the surviving examples, careful conservation is essential to their preservation after many years in storage and a fluctuating relevance in society as they fell in and out of fashion. Conservator Sarah Babister states that cork models ‘were really popular at a certain time and were kept as tools to teach students. Then they fell out of fashion and a lot of them were disposed of.’ (Kate C. 2014). 

This helps to explain why there are so few examples surviving on public display. There has however been a recent recognition of the value of cork models which has led to a more conscious conservation of these pieces with the excellent reinstatement of the Soane model room and a fantastic Colosseum at Australia’s Museum Victoria.

This original 18th century model (Fig.5) was produced by British modelmaker Richard Du Bourg and thankfully spared the ‘no longer in vogue’ fate of so many of his other works. Richard Gillespie at Museum Victoria has written on the subject that stemmed from his intrigue of the Colosseum model that had sat unused in the museum stores for some 20 years. Having researched and discovered several other examples of Cork Colosseum models in European collections Gillespie concludes that separately these models had varied purposes. This is reflective of the wider, multifaceted use of modelmaking in architecture in contemporary practice.

“The [various] Colosseum models […] differed in purpose, combining to different degrees antiquarian interest, archaeological research and documentation, evocation of classical architecture and history, courtly collections, public exhibition and education, commercial opportunity – and artistic endeavour, for the carving of cork into extraordinary classical structures and architecture had a technical and aesthetic appeal for the modellers and their audiences” (Gillespie, 2016)

Using Cork Modelling Today

In current practice cork is still used on occasion by modelmakers but rarely as the sole building material as it was in the golden age of the grand tourist. Makers wanting to try their hand today can find cork in good art and craft stores in both thin sheet and block form. In sheet form it has proved popular and lends itself well to the 21st century workhorse of the workshop, the laser cutter. Over the last few years we have moved to encourage aspects of this classical method of making into some of our works here at B.15. Using files, scalpels and sandpaper it is easy and engaging to sculpt into pieces of cork often requiring the user to study the subject in greater detail than they might on passing, much like life drawing or sketching.

I recently ran a short workshop on sculpting in cork in association with the ‘What We Do Here’ film project at the European Cultural Centre in Venice during the 16th Architecture Biennale. The atelier symposium; ‘Joined Up Thinking’ presented different approaches to studying, recording and designing space. Students of MSA’s Platform Atelier were given blocks of cork with the task of recreating a detail chosen from their time exploring Venice. These sketch models allowed students to engage with the material, largely for the first time, and to think about their chosen subject in carefully considered stages due to the subtractive process.

Senior lecturer and head of Platform atelier Matt Ault explains the context of the task in his teaching:

“The ever increasing availability and access to computational power continues to expand our design capacity for conceptualising, developing, communicating and fabricating. The move towards digital craft and digital tectonics recognises the central role of materiality and materialisation in architectural design and allows the benefits of the digital to be informed by our own material understanding.

Active sketching techniques of drawing, modelling and making result in a deeper understanding of any idea under interrogation or critique.

Our recent use of the cork sketching technique in Venice is part of a design task that also comprises the complimentary techniques in modelling and fabrication: digitally exploring complex, fluid surface morphologies by defining associative geometries that can be manipulated on screen.  Design iterations can be quickly and cheaply made physical through manufacturing and assembling from paper or card with the digital plotter-cutter. Testing, evaluation and understanding of the material sketch model and its construction logic feeds back into the digital modelling to evolve the design.”

(Ault, 2019)
 

Despite its age as a modelling method, it was clear following this task that cork sculpting can still offer us a mode of thought that the most contemporary mediums often steer us away from. It provides a much needed tactility to students learning along with the opportunity to expand on unknown possibilities that result from “mistakes” made along the way. During the assignment the concentration in the room was palpable with everyone, tutors included absorbed in the task at hand whilst clearly enjoying the process.

The work produced, along with additional cork sketch models will be featured at the MSA end of year show presenting the cork sculpts as 3D sketches. I look forward to seeing more examples in the coming weeks.

Scott Miller 2019


References

Ault, M, 2019, Cork Task [E-Mail]

C. Kate, 2014. Cork Colosseum X-Ray [Online Article] Available From: http://museumvictoria.com.au/about/mv-blog/apr-2014/cork-colosseum-x-ray/ Accessed 01/12/2014

Coffin, S. D. 2014. Cork for More Than Wine, The Temple of Vesta, Tivoli [Online Article] http://www.cooperhewitt.org/2014/10/30/cork-for-more-than-wine-the-temple-of-vesta-tivoli/ Accessed 01/12/14

Collen, D. 2013. The Cork-Models [Online Article] Available from: http://www.coellen-cork.com/eng/antike/history.htm Accessed 01/12/2014

Fouskaris, J. 2006. Studio I – Music Stroll Garden [Online Article] Available From: http://www.jonfouskaris.com/portfolio/music-garden.html Accessed 01/12/2014

Gillespie, R. 2016. Journal of the Classical Association of Victoria, New Series, Volume 29, From ‘Trash’ to Treasure: Museum Victoria’s Colosseum Model Available from: https://classicsvic.files.wordpress.com/2018/05/gillespie.pdf Accessed 26/11/2018

Gillespie, R. 2017. Journal of the History of Collections vol. 29 no. 2 pp. 251–269, Richard Du Bourg’s ‘Classical Exhibition’ Available From: https://academic.oup.com/jhc/article-abstract/29/2/251/2503305

Mass, M. 2014. Rare Model Craft: In The Beginning There was The Cork [Online Article] Available From: http://www.spiegel.de/karriere/berufsleben/kork-modelle-von-antiken-bauwerken-dieter-coellen-baut-miniaturen-a-983770.html Accessed 01/12/2014

Images

Fig. 1: Coellen, D. 2013 Tempel des Castor und Pollux [Online Image] Available from:  http://www.spiegel.de/fotostrecke/dieter-coellen-baut-korkmodelle-von-antiken-bauwerken-fotostrecke-115570-8.html Accessed 01/12/2014

Fig. 2: Coellen, D. 2013 Natur pur (2) [Online Image] Available From: http://www.spiegel.de/fotostrecke/dieter-coellen-baut-korkmodelle-von-antiken-bauwerken-fotostrecke-115570-3 Accessed 01/12/2014

Fig 3. Sir John Soanes Museum, London, Model of the Roman circular Temple of Vesta at Tivoli, near Rome, by Giovanni Altieri [Online Image]Available From: http://collections.soane.org/object-mr2 Accessed 01/10/2018

Fig 4.  Sir John Soanes Museum, London, Model of the Temple of Zeus or Apollo (the so-called Temple of Neptune or Poseidon), Paestum Attributed to Domenico Padiglione c.1820 [Online Image]Available From: http://collections.soane.org/object-mr25  Accessed 01/10/2018

Fig 5. Museums Victoria Collections, Melbourne Australia, Model – Colosseum, Richard Du Bourg, London 1775 [Online Image] Available From: https://collections.museumvictoria.com.au/items/715107 Accessed 27/11/2018

Fig 6. Miller S. 2015, Cork Block and Sheet [Original Image]

Fig 7. Miller S. 2015, A cork sketch model by the author. [Original Image]

Figs 8 – 11. Miller S. 2018 ‘Grand Tour’ cork modelling task in Venice in association with the ECC [Original Images]

SimpsonHaugh B.15 Modelmaking Awards 2019

“Modelmaking is an integral component in the practice of architectural design, providing the first opportunity to bring two dimensional drawings and sketches into the three dimensional world as physical objects.”

For the second year running we are pleased to announce this years student modelmaking awards will be sponsored by SimpsonHaugh. Last years scheme brought out some tough competition across all years and we hope to see more great original modelmaking ideas being pushed in this years submissions.

Awards are open to BA 3rd year and both 5th and 6th year of MArch and will be awarded as 1st, 2nd and 3rd prizes for BA & MArch MSA students.


At last year’s SimpsonHaugh B.15 Model Making Awards, we were very impressed with the high standard of models produced by MSA students. We are thrilled to be supporting the awards again this year, and look forward to meeting new students and observing their design development through model making.

Model making is an integral component in the practice of architectural design, providing the first opportunity to bring two dimensional drawings and sketches into the three dimensional world as physical objects. Physical models are tools used to fully test, explore and understand building designs. They convey the true effects of scale, light and materiality where computer technology may restrict us.

This year, we would like to see students demonstrate an understanding of appropriate scale, tools and materials in the construction of their models, as well as consider material costs, time frame and build approach.  

Although final presentation models are a great way to bring together a completed design and polish our making skills, we also want to see evidence of sketch/study models which test and explore design elements. These quick studies bring greater depth and substance to a project, which sequentially lead to more refined presentation models.

At SimpsonHaugh we use physical models to develop and refine building proposals. Models are used as tools within the design teams, in client meetings and for public consultation as a means of translating drawings and ideas into a tangible reality, which can be more clearly understand through physical interaction.

We are excited to see what creative and amazing models MSA students produce this year!

 

-Kaia Williams and Phillipa Seagrave, SimpsonHaugh Modelmakers


Awards Launch open office event

Following a successful open office event last year SimpsonHaugh have again agreed to open their doors for an official launch of our award scheme on Wednesday March 20th at 17.00. There will be a short presentation about this years awards scheme followed by refreshments and a chance to, see the office/workshop, ask questions and network with SH staff.

>>>>>    Click here to register and secure your ticket for the launch.    <<<<<

Entry to this event is strictly limited and exclusive to MSA students.

Registered ticket holders only. Sign up early to ensure your place


SimpsonHaugh Modelmakers at B.15

During the final term there will be a number of dates where Kaia Williams and Phillipa Seagrave, in-house Modelmakers at SH will be present at the workshop to offer advice and observe work in progress. This is a great opportunity to speak to experienced modelmakers who can offer tips from their experience of working creatively under pressure. These dates will be confirmed soon and posted to Moodle and on social media.

Find out more about SimpsonHaugh here: www.simpsonhaugh.com/


Submitting your projects

Further information about the submission process will be announced in the coming weeks via our blog/moodle. Check back here and keep an eye on moodle for updates.

This award scheme is exclusively for MSA BA 3rd year and MArch 5th and 6th year students.

 

‘Celebrating Burnage Garden Village: Building Manchesters Pioneering Housing’ Exhibition

Senior Workshop Technician Jim Backhouse recently completed two vintage style models for the upcoming exhibition ‘Celebrating Burnage Garden Village: Building Manchesters Pioneering Housing’ which will open with a launch event this coming Saturday at Manchester’s Central Library.

The two models show the overall estate plan at 1:500 along with a 1:100 model of a semi-detached house. Jim’s modelling style took inspiration from the original plans and drawings from the early 20th century hand finishing components using water colour.

Exhibition Launch description:

Burnage Garden Village, built 1908-1910, is an little gem, with architectural influences from Raymond Unwin and other Arts and Crafts enthusiasts. It is still managed by a local committee of Manchester Tenants Ltd established in 1906. Come to the launch of a small exhibition detailing the design and building of this pioneering Garden Village here in Manchester, hear about how it attracted socialists, suffrage campaigners and conscientious objectors as well as some extraordinary artists, sculptors and explorers.

Opening at Manchester Central Library this Saturday, March 2nd and running for the duration of March.

Tickets for the opening event are free and available here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/celebrating-burnage-garden-village-building-manchesters-pioneering-housing-tickets-55917194835

‘The Value of The Studio Workshop’ via the V&A’s Architectural Models Network

The V&A museum has a research group focused on the history, present and future use of Architectural models in practice and education.

The ongoing project has looked at a variety of model case studies and perspectives which are published on their blog. Most recently we have contributed a technicians perspective from our experience here at B.15.

You can read our article and find the other ongoing publications at the AMN blog here: https://www.vam.ac.uk/blog/projects/the-value-of-the-studio-workshop

Scott

Upcoming workshop closure dates

The workshop will be closed to general student and staff access at the following times due to the formal interviewing process for a new member of staff. Apologies for any inconvenience caused.

Wednesday 23rd January 09.30 – 14.00 – Open as normal from 14.00

TBC – Thursday 7th February – Closed all day

Jim and Scott